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NB Tekela 3 Boots

Debuting in 2018, the Tekela Pro is New Balance's control silo and overtook the mostly unsuccessful Visaro Pro range but is it a football boot you should consider? We can tell you everything you need to know about the Tekela Pro!

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Available in Three Levels

Designed for Five Pitch Types

Read our Boot Secrets guide:

Tekela Boot Versions

Pro ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

The Tekela V3+ Pro is one of New Balance's top-end football boot offering. It has a high-cut collar and a laceless closure, plus a soft and padded Hypoknit upper that gives the boot a sock-like feel when wearing it. The Kinetic Stitch texturing not only gives the boot a certain element of grip, it also reinforces the structure of its knitted upper without sacrificing its pliability. It might present some difficulty when trying to put them on, but once in the elastic band sitting under the knitted tongue does a good job securing the foot in place. Wide option availability depends on the colourway.

Magia ⭐⭐⭐⭐

The Tekela V3+ Magia switches to a meshed upper that still has the Kinetic Stitch technologies. Front and back pull tabs are retained, something to hold on to and assist in putting the laceless New Balance boots on. The soleplate is primarily TPU with an inlayed nylon chassis and the stud configuration consists of fully rounded square with no identation (unlike the ones in the Pro model). You can get the Tekela Magia in both standard and wide sizes.

Magique ⭐⭐⭐

The Tekela Magique is the cheapest option for the silo, and a significant change is that it has laces. Best used for casual play or amateur football, as the synthetic upper might produce pain points in high-intensity environments. The soleplate is now fully TPU. The tongue and collar is now comprised of a looser knit material with no front and back pull tab extensions. Magique is only standard-fitting.



Types For Different Pitches

Grass – FG (Firm Ground)

New Balance's Tekela's soleplate is nylon-based, which makes it fall on the stiffer side of things but at least gains a little bit of a springback effect. The rounded square studs function mostly like conical ones, but incorporates some slight indentation just to give it some more penetrating ability.

Muddy – SG (Soft Ground)

The SG Tekela can be bought at the Pro level, meaning that you get to enjoy the benefits of its high-end nylon soleplate with moulded conicals and metallic soft ground studs. The pointed orientation and additional weight of the metal studs allows for more penetration even if some mud clamp together in wet pitches.

3G/4G/5G – AG (Artificial Ground)

The Tekela AG essentially is the same as that of the Furon AG. It's a TPU plate with an inlay nylon chassis and hallowed conicals that are a bit shorter than their FG counterpart. The toe is also relatively low rather than raised. The lower profile and shorter stud combine to bring the foot closer to the synthetic pitch, which has more density than the natural grass. You can buy the Tekela AG in the Magia and Magique tiers.

Turf – TF

The Tekela TF, being that it is an option in the Magique level, is one of the cheap turf boots available in the market. As a turf boot, it does have small rubber bumps on the outsole that is sure to grip the shallow, carpet-like astro-turf pitches, while being a Magique Tekela means you only get a structured synthetic upper with a laced closure. Consider this boot for non-competitive indoor football only.

The Tekela Pro is focused on control, touch and comfort and opts for a Kinetic Stitch synthetic upper which provides the wearer with a very comfortable fit while providing added grip on the ball.

The wider fitting option by New Balance, the Tekela is arguably New Balance's highest performing football boot they've ever produced.

This indepth report was written by Ian Ebbs, founder of FootballBoots.co.uk in 2010. He supports Blackburn Rovers, is President of a 1,000 member football club, a central midfielder he plays twice a week and coaches Junior teams.